Author Archives: Brian Aberback

Photos from Tuesday’s Mill Creek Walk Part 1 or 2

Egrets

Thanks to Joe Koscielny for these awesome shots taken Tuesday during the BCAS Mill Creek Marsh walk! We’ll have a second batch later today.

The next BCAS Meadowlands Nature Walk is at Mill Creek on Sunday, Sept. 3, from 10 am to noon. For more info, contact Don Torino at greatauk4@gmail.com or 201-230-4983.

Great Blue Heron

Semipalmated Sandpiper

Least Sandpiper

Herring Gull

Song Sparrow

Reminder: Mill Creek Nature Walk Tomorrow (Aug. 15)!

Join the Bergen County Audubon Society for a guided nature walk at Mill Creek Marsh tomorrow (Aug. 15) from 10 am to noon. We’ll be keeping our eyes peeled for for Sandpipers (pictured above), Yellowlegs, shorebirds and more. Park and meet in the parking lot at the back of the Mill Creek Mall by the Bob’s Furniture Store.

BCAS walks are a great experience for new and experienced nature lovers and birders alike. Your guides point out birds along the way and bring a spotting scope so you can see them up close. They’ll also talk about the vegetation you encounter and the history of the marsh.

For more information contact Don Torino at greatauk4@gmail.com or 201-230-4983.

Regina Geoghan: Bumble Bee Buzz

A close up view of a very busy bumble bee enjoying collecting pollen in ar garden patch of purple cone flowers.

Here’s the latest from our guest columnist Regina Geoghan. Thanks Regina!

Bumble Bee BUZZ

Have you ever stopped to watch a bumble bee in action?  They are hard to miss, particularly in early and mid-summer, when the flowers begin to bloom.  You might avoid them or simply ignore them but, hmmm, I don’t recall meeting anyone visiting DeKorte, Mill Creek or other Meadowland parks to watch bees.

Bird-watching, butterfly seeking yes. But bumble bees?  If you’ve walked near the pollinator flower patches in the parks or your own garden, you have surely noticed them as they flit from flower to flower, sipping nectar, and sometimes coated with the yellow pollen. Noticed yes, but I think it is safe to say that for the most part, they are not really seen, understood or appreciated.

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